dallas texas city logo

Learn More About Dallas, TX Here: Dallas, TX Website

Al’s Plumbing, Heating & Air Conditioning Provides Maintenance, Repair & Replacement services for Plumbing & HVAC in Dallas, TX. 

Since 1989,  Al’s has served southern Denton & Collin counties, northern Dallas County & northeast Tarrant County with up to a 12 Truck Service Fleet to serve you promptly.

This Is What You Get With Al’s:

  • As a company, Al’s has a Texas Plumbing License, PLUS
  • We employ only Texas Licensed Plumbers.  The Plumber coming into your home also has a Texas Plumber License.
  • We pull all Plumbing and HVAC Permits required by your City.  You can check your City’s website to know when a Plumbing or HVAC Permit is required.
  • We employ NATE Certified HVAC Technicians (Details on NATE below.  Texas doesn’t have HVAC Licenses).
  • We install Brand-Specific Repair Parts versus “one size fits all”.
  • Our Service Staff has over 110 years experience.

emergency service

Al’s Offers 24 / 7 Emergency Service for both Plumbing & HVAC Systems in Dallas, TX.


Customer reviews
(7 reviews)

14 November, 2016

Great Service!

Customer reviews
(31 reviews)

Mr Chris

14 November, 2016

Great Service!

Boundaries and History of Dallas, TX

Boundaries of Dallas, TX

Dallas, TX is located almost entirely within a loop created by:

  • Rt. 12 / S. Walton Walker Blvd (to the west)
  • I-635 (to the north & east)
  • I-20 (to the south)

There Are These Exceptions To The Overall Borders (described just above):

  • In the north, Dallas’ boundary extends (north of I-635) to Pres. George Bush Turnpike – between the Dallas North Tollway and N. Coit Road.
  • In the Richardson / Garland area (northeast) – the boundary extends as far north as Centennial Blvd – between Coit Rd and S. Jupiter Road.
  • In the southeast, Dallas’ border extends 4 miles southeast of I-20, and includes the Dallas Southside Water Treatment Plant.
  • In the south, the border extends 2 miles south of I-20 between Rt. 342 and Lancaster – Hutchins Road.
  • In the south, (just west of extension described just above) the border extends 1 mile south of I-20 to W. Danieldale Road, between  I-35,E and U.S. Rt 67.
  • In the southwest, the border extends (west of  Rt. 12) to include Mountain Creek Lake and Mountain Creek Lake Park.  The border tapers northeast of this area until it’s (east of) Rt. 12 again.
  • In the northwest, Dallas’ border extends (west of Rt. 12, south of I-635) westward to the Elm Fork of the Trinity River, and northerly to include only the Elm Fork of Trinity River northward to E. Sandy Lake Road.
  • Also in the northwest, Dallas’ border extends to include Grapevine Creek (northward) to E. Belt Line Road and including North Lake (lake) and the area immediately surrounding it.

History Of Dallas, TX

DALLAS, TEXAS is the largest city in the Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) metropolitan area (known to locals as “the Metroplex”). With a Metro-Area 2010 population of 6.3 million, and a 2017 population estimate of 7 million, DFW is the 4th largest Metro-Area in the United States. Also, with a growth rate of +145,000 residents in July 1, 2014 — July 1, 2015, DFW was the 2nd fastest growing metro in the U.S. (Houston Metro was #1). Note: These numbers represent increases in number of residents, not percents.

Dallas is located along the Trinity River in the center of Dallas County Texas. Dallas is in north Texas, 350 miles south of the Texas / Oklahoma border. The city was founded by John Neely Byan, who settled on the east bank of the Trinity in November 1841. Bryan had picked the best spot for a trading post to serve the population migrating into the region.

Unknown to Bryan was that he had settled on land that was granted, by the Republic of Texas, to the Texan Land and Emigration Company of St. Louis. The company eventually legalized their claim to the land, and extensive promotional efforts of the Peters Colony attracted settlers to the region. In 1844 J. P. Dumas surveyed and laid out a townsite comprising a half mile square of blocks and streets.

When Dallas County was formed in 1846, Dallas was designated as the temporary county seat. In 1850, voters selected it as the permanent county seat over Hord’s Ridge (Oak Cliff) and Cedar Springs, both of which eventually came within the Dallas city limits.

The Texas legislature granted Dallas a town charter on February 2, 1856. Dr. Samuel Pryor was the first mayor, and headed a town government consisting of six aldermen, a treasurer-recorder, and a constable. Dallas quickly became a service center for the rural area surrounding it. By the 1850’s, it had dry-goods stores, groceries, a drugstore, an insurance agency, a boot & shoe shop, brickyards, and saddle shops, as well as a weekly newspaper, the Dallas Herald, founded in 1849.

In 1852, French immigrant Maxime Guillot established the 1st factory in Dallas, manufacturing carriages and wagons. Alexander and Sarah Horton Cockrell purchased the remaining interest in the townsite for $7,000 in 1852. They built a three-story brick hotel, a steam sawmill, and a flour mill. With the breakup of the nearby La Réunion colony in the late 1850’s, skilled European craftsmen and artists moved into Dallas, including brickmakers, cabinetmakers, tailors, milliners, brewers, and musicians. In 1860, Dallas’ population was 678.

The Art Saloon of Adolph Gouhenant (a photograph gallery) was located on the south side of the courthouse square in the 1850s. It was an early expression of artistic interest in Dallas. An 1857 diary reference “to a visit to the court house to look at the paintings of the Hudson scholars” may mark the earliest art exhibit in Dallas. Art shows at the annual state fairs after 1886 exposed art to the publi, while plans for the Carnegie Library, which opened in 1901, included an upstairs art gallery. The success of early shows there, which featured such regional artists as Frank (Charles F.) Reaugh and Edward G. Eisenlohr, led to the organization of the Dallas Art Association, which began assembling a permanent collection. After several moves and name changes, the Dallas Museum of Art now occupies a building designed by Edward Larrabee Barnes in the Dallas Arts District. By 1873 Dallas had a theater, Field’s Opera House, where the first performance of an opera in the city took place in February 1875.

The influx of German immigrants led to the formation of the Dallas Frohsinn, a male singing society and member of the Texas State Sängerbund, which hosted statewide singing meets in 1883, 1892, 1904, and 1914. The Dallas Symphony Orchestra traces its roots to performances in 1900, and the Dallas Opera was launched in 1957. In the early 1920s Dallas became home to one of the earliest radio stations in Texas, WFAA.

On July 8, 1860, a fire originating in the W. W. Peak Brothers Drugstore spread to the other buildings on the square and destroyed most of the businesses. Dallas was selected as one of 11 quartermaster and commissary posts in Texas for the Trans-Mississippi Army of the Confederacy. After the war, freed slaves flocked to Dallas in search of jobs and settled in towns on the periphery of the city. By 1870 the population was about 3,000.

The key to economic expansion had always been transportation in and out of the region. Early attempts to navigate the Trinity River proved impractical, so Dallas businessmen turned their attention to securing rail service. They succeeded in attracting the Houston and Texas Central in 1872 and the Texas and Pacific in 1873, making Dallas one of the first rail crossroads in Texas. Dallas found itself in a strategic geographical location for the transport of abundant regional products to northern and eastern manufacturing plants. Cotton became the region’s principal cash crop. Elm Street in Dallas was where cotton was marketed. Dallas also became the world center for the leather and buffalo-hide trade. Merchants who opened general stores along the railroad route (as rail construction crept north) settled in Dallas and founded their flagship stores there. By 1880, Dallas’ population had reached 10,385.

During 1875-1990, Banking and Insurance emerged as major industries under the leadership of such men as William Henry Gaston, William L. Cabell, and J. T. Trezevant. With their close involvement in civic affairs, Dallas businessmen launched the State Fair of Texas, organized a board of trade, and founded a merchants exchange to promote the city’s favorable business climate. Dallas acquired telephone service in 1881, electricity in 1882, and had several daily newspapers, principally the Dallas Morning News (1885) and the Dallas Times Herald (1888).

In 1890, Dallas ranked as the most populous city in Texas, with 38,067 residents. Three years later, in the wake of a national financial panic, 5 Dallas banks and several industries failed while cotton prices dropped to less than five cents a pound. The panic also affected unionized labor, which had just begun to organize. The American Federation of Labor granted a charter to the Trades Assembly of Dallas in 1899. Among its early causes was championship of the 8-hour workday and legislation outlawing the firing of union members.

By 1900, the economy had recovered, and Dallas was the leading book, drug, jewelry, and wholesale liquor market in the Southwest. It was the world’s leading inland cotton market, and it still led the world in manufacture of saddles and cotton-gin machinery. Its population stood at 42,638.

In 1905 businessmen formed the 150,000 Club, aimed at increasing the city’s population to 150,000 by 1910. Although the numerical goal was not met until 1920, the population had increased to 92,104 by 1910, and the city doubled in area to 18.31 square miles, partly through annexation of Oak Cliff in 1904. In 1907, Dallas built its first steel skyscraper, the fifteen-story Praetorian Building, located at Main and Stone Street in the Main Street District of downtown Dallas. It was demolished in 2013.

In the 1920’s, Dallas began to implement the city plan, commissioned from George E. Kessler, after a disastrous flood in 1908. Oak Cliff and Dallas were connected by the Houston Street Viaduct. At the time, the Viaduct was the longest concrete structure in the world. The Union Terminal Company consolidated six downtown railroad depots.

Dallas was selected as the site for a Federal Reserve Bank in 1914, and Ford opened an auto assembly plant in the city. A wave of immigrants from Mexico helped swell the population to 158,976 by 1920, when Dallas ranked as the 42nd largest city in the nation.

The post World War I era was marked by the reemergence of the Ku Klux Klan. With 13,000 members, the Dallas chapter was the largest in Texas, and the national “imperial wizard” was a Dallas cut-rate dentist named Hiram Wesley Evans. Some 75,000 citizens greeted Evans on “Klan Day” at the 1923 State Fair. The Dallas Morning News led the attack on the Klan, helping Ma (Miriam A.) Ferguson defeat Dallas judge Felix Robertson (the Klan candidate) in a Democratic runoff for governor in 1925.

Dallas women had been in the forefront of movements in Texas for reform in child-welfare practices, pure food and drink legislation, sanitation, and other causes. By 1920, women were also entering the workforce in increasing numbers. In 1927 the local chapter of the National Association of Business and Professional Women estimated there were 15,000 women working in 125 occupations, trades, and professions in Dallas. Dallas was also a major center for the textile industry, which employed many women as dressmakers. Minority businesses also began to organize. The Dallas Negro Chamber of Commerce (later re-named the Dallas Black Chamber of Commerce) was organized in 1925, and the Mexican Chamber of Commerce (now the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce) was formed in 1940.

The Great Depression, which began in late 1929, put 15,000 Dallas residents on the relief roles by 1933, while retail sales and bank deposits plummeted. The population of 260,475 by 1930, climbed to only 294,734 in 1940. The pain of the depression was eased somewhat for Dallas by the discovery of oil in East Texas in 1930. Dallas bankers, such as Nathan Adams of the First National Bank in Dallas, were the first in the nation to conceive of the idea of lending money to oil companies using their oil reserves (still in the ground) for collateral. Dallas soon became a center for petroleum financing.

In a massive engineering effort begun in 1930, the channel of the Trinity River was moved, straightened, and confined between levees to prevent future flooding. Fair Park became the site of the Texas Centennial celebration, thus providing work for local builders, contractors, advertisers, concessionaires, and construction workers. The city played host to ten million visitors, including President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

In 1907 Dallas voters had adopted the commission form of city government to replace the Aldermanic system. In 1930, the Citizens Charter Association won voter approval for the council-manager form of city government; an amendment in 1949 provided for direct election of the mayor.

Dallas purchased Fair Park from its owners in 1904, and continues to maintain this National Historic Landmark through a contract with the State Fair of Texas. Other municipal facilities include City Hall, Dallas Convention Center, Dallas Public Library, Dallas Zoo, Union Terminal, and Love Field. The city also owns the Dallas Museum of Art, the Morton Meyerson Symphony Hall, the Dallas Zoo, and the Dallas Arboretum. Most of the cultural institutions are operated by private, nonprofit entities under contracts with the city.

Bryan’s original survey for Dallas used the Trinity River as the western boundary, with streets laid out at right angles to the river. A competing survey drawn by Warren A. Ferris, was laid out at 45 degrees off cardinal directions. A third survey made for the Peters colony laid out sections using cardinal directions. The results are an odd series of doglegged streets downtown. Annexation of adjacent communities added another layer of surveying patterns to the Dallas street map. Although the first residential subdivision, the Cedars, was built south of downtown in the 1880s, most residential development has been toward the north and east.

The building boom of the 1970s and 1980s produced a distinctive contemporary profile for the downtown area, influenced by nationally prominent architects. At the same time, the establishment of the West End Historic District in the 1980s preserved a group of late-nineteenth-century brick warehouses that have been adapted for use as restaurants and shops. Similar efforts have been made in Deep Ellum, where the 1920s-era storefronts now house clubs and restaurants.

The Dallas Park Department oversees 406 parks that cover 50,000 acres. White Rock Lake, Bachman Lake, and Lake Cliff are surrounded by parks, and city-owned greenbelts follow the waterways in the city including White Rock Creek, Turtle Creek, and the Trinity River.

Baseball was played in Dallas as early as 1877, when a touring team played a local team. By 1882 Dallas had its first semiprofessional team (the Brown Stockings) which won the league championship in 1883 and 1884. The Dallas Hams, a professional team, won the Texas League pennant in 1888; Dallas continued to field minor league teams until 1970.

Football made its first appearance in Dallas with the organization of a Dallas Football Club in 1891. A team formed at Dallas High School in 1900 is thought to have been the first high school team in Texas. SMU sent a team to the 1935 Rose Bowl, and Doak Walker drew crowds to the Cotton Bowl in the late 1940s.

Two professional teams, the Dallas Cowboys and the Dallas Texans, competed for fans in the early 1960s, until owner Lamar Hunt moved the Texans to Kansas City in 1963. The Dallas Cowboys (who play AT&T Stadium in Arlington) won Superbowl titles in 1972, 1978, 1993, 1994, and 1996.

Dallas’ first professional basketball team, the Chaparrals, was moved to San Antonio. The new franchise, the Dallas Mavericks, was organized in 1980. Dallas also hosts a professional soccer team, the Sidekicks, and an NHL hockey team, the Dallas Stars.

One of the premier suburbs in Texas, Highland Park, was developed within Dallas during the early part of the twentieth century. It was the location of the first large-scale shopping center in the nation, Highland Park Village. In 1931, Highland Park incorporated, and its battles with Dallas over annexation lasted into the 1940s.

Until World War II (which began on Dec 7, 1941) Dallas ranked as a minor manufacturing center in the nation. Its three leading industries were food processing, apparel manufacturing, and printing & publishing. Then war-related industries, such as North American Aviation, pushed industrial employment in Dallas to more than 75,000 in 1944. Dallas businesses experienced a boom after World War II that was comparable to that following the coming of the railroads. In 1949, five new businesses opened each day and thirteen new manufacturing plants opened every month. In 1950 the population stood at 434,462.

During the 1950s and 1960s, Dallas became the nation’s third-largest technology center, with the growth of such companies as Texas Instruments. In 1957 two developers, Trammell Crow and John M. Stemmons, opened a Home Furnishings Mart that grew into the Dallas Market Center, the largest wholesale trade complex in the world. In 1974, the opening of Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) attracted numerous corporate headquarters to Dallas and consolidating the city’s reputation as a national financial and business center.

Educational institutions have been present in Dallas since its earliest years. Private schools and academies preceded the founding of the public school system in 1884. The present Dallas Independent School District, with more than 130,000 students, is the eighth largest school district in the nation. Institutions of higher learning include several campuses of Dallas County Community College, established in 1965, located within the city.

Southern Methodist University, founded in 1911; Bishop College, a historically black institution founded in Marshall in 1881; and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, founded in 1943.

Source: Handbook of Texas Online, Jackie McElhaney and Michael V. Hazel, “Dallas, TX,” accessed February 06, 2017, http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/hdd01.

Did this code work for you?
only $69.95
$69.95 Furnace Inspection
Coupon cannot be combined with other discounts, coupons, or offers. Other restrictions may apply
$69.95
Expires on Apr/30/2017
Did this code work for you?
only $69.95
$69.95 Central A/C Inspection
Coupon cannot be combined with other discounts, coupons, or offers. Other restrictions may apply.
$69.95
Expires on Apr/30/2017
Did this code work for you?
$15 OFF
$15 OFF HVAC Repair
Coupon cannot be combined with other discounts, coupons, or offers. Other restrictions may apply.
$15 OFF
Expires on Apr/30/2017
Did this code work for you?
$100 OFF
$100 OFF New HVAC System Installation
Coupon cannot be combined with other discounts, coupons, or offers. Other restrictions may apply.
$100 OFF
Expires on Apr/30/2017
Did this code work for you?
$25 OFF
$25 OFF Thermostat Installation
Coupon cannot be combined with other discounts, coupons, or offers. Other restrictions may apply.
$25 OFF
Expires on Apr/30/2017
Did this code work for you?
$50 OFF
$50 OFF Water Heater Replacement
Coupon cannot be combined with other discounts, coupons, or offers. Other restrictions may apply.
$50 OFF
Expires on Apr/30/2017
Did this code work for you?
$25 OFF
$25 OFF Kitchen Sink Drain, Faucet or Disposal Replacement
Coupon cannot be combined with other discounts, coupons, or offers. Other restrictions may apply.
$25 OFF
Expires on Apr/30/2017
Did this code work for you?
$25 OFF
$25 OFF Sewer Line Cleaning
Coupon cannot be combined with other discounts, coupons, or offers. Other restrictions may apply.
$25 OFF
Expires on Apr/30/2017
Did this code work for you?
only $49.95
$49.95 Bio clean
BIO-CLEAN uses natural bacteria and enzymes to Digest Organic Waste in your plumbing system. --- Coupon cannot be combined with other discounts, coupons, or offers. Other restrictions may apply.
only$49.95
Expires on Apr/30/2017
Did this code work for you?
$25 OFF
$25 OFF Bathroom Faucet, Toilet, Shower, Tub Replacement
Coupon cannot be combined with other discounts, coupons, or offers. Other restrictions may apply.
$25 OFF
Expires on Apr/30/2017
Did this code work for you?
$25 OFF Any
$25 OFF Any Indoor Air Quality Purchase
Coupon cannot be combined with other discounts, coupons, or offers. Other restrictions may apply.
$25 OFF
Expires on Apr/30/2017